MCQs in English (General)
English Grammar
English Comprehension

English MCQs test consists of English Grammer, English Comprehension and General English MCQs. These tests are designed for Candidates appearing in any type of Competitive Exams or Screening Tests for Admissions and Jobs Hunting. BEST OF LUCK!

  •   Q: 1 The machine is difficult to build ...... easy to maintain. [English (General)]
         abut
         band
         cfor
         dif
         enone
  •   Q: 2 It was expected by the romans that thye would conquer Carthage. (change to active voice) [English (General)]
         aThe romans expected to conquer Carthage
         bThe romans were expecting to conquer Cathage
         cThe Romans would be expecting that they would conquer Carthage
         dCarthage eolud be conquered was the expectation of Roamns
         eNone
  •   Q: 3 The doctor advised him to go.............several medical tests. [English (General)]
         aThrough
         bInto
         cUnder
         dAbout
         enone of these
  •   Q: 4 The successful.............of a novel or a poem requires fluency in two languages. [English (General)]
         aPublication
         bReproduction
         cWriting
         dTranslation
         enone of these
  •   Q: 5 I am surprised that she spends so much, because I know ___________ she earns. [English (General)]
         ahow less
         bhow little
         chow not very much
         dhow least
         eNone of the above
  •   Q: 6 Before you decide, canvass the voters. [English (General)]
         aJudge minutely
         bSurvey in detail
         cConsider
         dQuestion
         eNone of the above
  •   Q: 7 Alleviate [English (General)]
         aRemonstrate
         bTo lessen
         cAggravate
         dDetetiorate
         eNone
  •   Q: 8 If you worked hard, you _______________. [English Grammar]
         awould be succeed
         bwould have succeeded
         cwill succeed
         dwould succeed
         eNone of these
  •   Q: 9 She wishes she _____________ a rich woman. [English Grammar]
         awill be
         bis
         cto be
         dwere
         eNone of these
  •   Q: 10 None of the students _____ failed [English Grammar]
         aNone of the students has failed
         bNone of the students were failed
         cNone of the student has failed
         dNone of these
  •   Q: 11 If reporting verb is present or future tense then [English Grammar]
         aVerb of reported speech will change to Past Perfect Tense.
         bVerb of reported speech will change to Past Tense.
         cVerb of reported speech will change.
         dVerb of reported speech will not change.
         eNone of these
  •   Q: 12 Mujahid says, "Ali will go and meet you" [English Grammar]
         aMujahid says that Ali would go and meet you
         bMujahid say that Ali will go and meet you
         c Mujahid says that Ali will go and meet you
         dMujahid says that Ali will go and met you
         eNone of these
  •   Q: 13 If actual words of a speaker are reported in own words, then it is [English Grammar]
         aIndirect speech
         bDirect speech
         cNone of these
  •   Q: 14 Cats eat fish is?. [English Grammar]
         aPassive Voice
         bNone
         cActive Voice
         dNone of these
  •   Q: 15 Unemployment is an important index of economic slack and lost output, but it is much more than that. For the unemployed person, it is often a damaging affront to human dignity and sometimes a catastrophic blow to family life. Nor is this cost distributed in proportion to ability to bear it. It falls most heavily on the young, the semiskilled and unskilled, the black person, the older worker, and underemployed person in a low income rural area who is denied the option of securing more rewarding urban employment…. The concentrated incidence of unemployment among specific groups in the population means far greater costs to society that can be measured simply in hours of involuntary idleness or dollars of income lost. The extra costs include disruption of the careers of young people, increased juvenile delinquency, and perpetuation of conditions which breed racial discrimination in employment and otherwise deny equality of opportunity. There is another and more subtle cost. The social and economic strains of prolonged underutilization create strong pressures for cost-increasing solutions…. On the side of labor, prolonged high unemployment leads to “share-the-work” pressures for shorter hours, intensifies resistance to technological change and to rationalization of work rules. On the side of business, the weakness of markets leads to attempts to raise prices to cover high average overhead casts and to pressures for protection against foreign and domestic competition. Q. Serious unemployment leads labor groups to demand [English Comprehension]
         amore jobs by having everyone work shorter hours
         bhigher wages to those employed
         c“no fire” policies
         dcost-cutting solutions
         ehigher social security payments
  •   Q: 16 The explosion of a star is an awesome event. The most violent of these cataclysms, which produce supernovae, probably destroys a star completely. Within our galaxy of roughly 100 billion stars the last supernova was observed in 1604. Much smaller explosions, however, occur quite frequently, giving rise to what astronomers call novae and dwarf novae. On the order of 25 novae occur in our galaxy every year, but only two or three are near enough to be observed. About 100 dwarf novae are known altogether. If the exploding star is in a nearby part of the galaxy, it may create a new star that was not previously visible to the naked eye. The last new star of this sort that could be observed clearly from the Northern Hemisphere appeared in 1946. In these smaller explosions the star loses only a minute fraction of its mass and survives to explode again. Astrophysicists are fairly well satisfied that they can account for the explosions of supernovae. The novae and dwarf novae have presented more of a puzzle. From recent investigations that have provided important new information about these two classes of exploding star, the picture that emerges is quite astonishing. It appears that every dwarf nova – and perhaps every nova – is a member of a pair of stars. The two stars are so close together that they revolve around a point that lies barely outside the surface of the larger star. As a result the period of rotation is usually only a few hours, and their velocities range upward to within a two-hundredth of the speed of light. Question: The statement, velocities range upward to within a two-hundredth of the speed of light is for A. novae B. dwarf novae C. supernova D. novae and dwarf novae E. pair of stars  [English Comprehension]
         aA
         bB
         cC
         dD
         eE
  •   Q: 17 Disequilibrium at the interface of water and air is a factor on which the transfer of heat and water vapor from the ocean to the air depends. The air within about a millimeter of the water is almost saturated with water vapor and the temperature of the air is close to that of the surface water. Irrespective of how small these differences might be, they are crucial, and the disequilibrium is maintained by air near the surface mixing with air higher up, which is typically appreciably cooler and lower in water vapor content. The turbulence, which takes its energy from the wind, mixes the air. As the speed of wind increases, so do the turbulence, and consequently the rate of heat and moisture transfer. We can arrive at a detailed understanding of this phenomenon after further study. The transfer of momentum from wind to water, which occurs when waves are formed, is an interacting-and complicated phenomenon. When waves are made by the wind, it transfers important amounts of energy-energy, which is consequently not available for the production of turbulence. Question: The wind over the ocean usually does which of the following according to the given passage? I. Leads to cool, dry air coming in proximity with the ocean surface. II. Maintains a steady rate of heat and moisture transfer between the ocean and the air. III. Results in frequent changes in the ocean surface temperature. A. I only B. II only C. I and II only D. II and III only E. I, II, and III [English Comprehension]
         aA
         bB
         cC
         dD
         eE
  •   Q: 18 Unemployment is an important index of economic slack and lost output, but it is much more than that. For the unemployed person, it is often a damaging affront to human dignity and sometimes a catastrophic blow to family life. Nor is this cost distributed in proportion to ability to bear it. It falls most heavily on the young, the semiskilled and unskilled, the black person, the older worker, and underemployed person in a low income rural area who is denied the option of securing more rewarding urban employment…. The concentrated incidence of unemployment among specific groups in the population means far greater costs to society that can be measured simply in hours of involuntary idleness or dollars of income lost. The extra costs include disruption of the careers of young people, increased juvenile delinquency, and perpetuation of conditions which breed racial discrimination in employment and otherwise deny equality of opportunity. There is another and more subtle cost. The social and economic strains of prolonged underutilization create strong pressures for cost-increasing solutions…. On the side of labor, prolonged high unemployment leads to “share-the-work” pressures for shorter hours, intensifies resistance to technological change and to rationalization of work rules. On the side of business, the weakness of markets leads to attempts to raise prices to cover high average overhead casts and to pressures for protection against foreign and domestic competition. Q. According to the passage, a typical business reaction to a recession is to press for [English Comprehension]
         ahigher unemployment insurance
         bprotection against imports
         cgovernment action
         drestrictive business practices
         erestraint against union activity
  •   Q: 19 Some modern anthropologists hold that biological evolution has shaped not only human morphology but also human behavior. The role those anthropologists ascribe to evolution is not of dictating the details of human behavior but one of imposing constraints - ways of feeling, thinking, and acting that ''come naturally'' in archetypal situations in any culture. Our ''frailties'' - emotions and motives such as rage, fear, greed, gluttony, joy, lust, love-may be a very mixed assortment quality: we are, as we say, ''in the grip'' of them. And thus they give us our sense of constraints. Unhappily, some of those frailties our need for ever-increasing security among them is presently maladaptive. Yet beneath the overlay of cultural detail, they, too, are said to be biological in direction, and therefore as natural to us as are our appendixes. We would need to comprehend thoroughly their adaptive origins in order to understand how badly they guide us now. And we might then begin to resist their pressure. Question: The author implies that control to any extent over the ''frailties'' that constrain our behavior is thought to presuppose A. That those frailties and adaptive are recognized as currently beneficial and adaptive B. That there is little or no overlay of cultural detail that masks their true nature. C. That there are cultures in which those frailties do not ''come naturally'' and from which such control can be learned D. A full understanding of why those frailties evolved and of how they function now E. A thorough grasp of the principle that cultural detail in human behavior can differ arbitrarily from society to society.  [English Comprehension]
         aA
         bB
         cC
         dD
         eE
  •   Q: 20 The first person in the group starts off by naming anything that is geographical. It could be a city, state, country, river, lake, or any proper geographical term. For example, the person might say, "Boston." The second person has 10 seconds to think of how the word ends and come up with another geographical term starting with that letter. The second participant might say, "Norway," because the geographical term has to start with "N." The third person would have to choose a word beginning with "Y." If a player fails to think of a correct answer within the time limit, that player is out of the game. The last person to survive is the champion. Question: The answer must be... A. In New York. B. Within the United States. C. A proper geographical term. D. In the same region. E. Along a coast line. [English Comprehension]
         aa
         bb
         cc
         dd
         ee
  •   Q: 21 There is a quite common sentiment that the use of nuclear arms is obviously different to morality and that its making probably so, does not go far sufficient. These activities are not only conflicting to ethics but also to law and if the lawful objection can be added to the ethical, the argument beside the use and the produce of these weapons will significantly be unbreakable. Now the time is ripe to estimate the duty of scientist who intentionally uses their proficiency for the creation of such weapons which has deterious result on mankind. To this should be added to the fact that more than 50% of the trained scientific manpower on the earth is now busy in the armaments business. Now it is suitable that manufacture of arms of death in a world of scarcity is a question that must lay a hand on the scientific conscience. A gathering of biologists on the Long term wide-reaching Biological cost of Nuclear War added scary dimensions to those biological affects consequential from weather changes may at least be as severe as the direct ones. Sub cold temperature , low light levels and high dose of ionizing and ultra violet rays expanding for many months after a huge scale nuclear nation , at least in the northern hemisphere. Efficiency in usual and agricultural eco systems could be ruthlessly constrained for a year or more. Post war survivors would face malnourishment as well as chilly condition in the dark and be bare to near lethal dose of rays. If, as now seems possible, the southern hemisphere were exaggerated also, worldwide disruption of the bio sphere could result. In any event there could be stern consequences, even in the areas not exaggerated directly, because of the inter trust of the world financial system. In either case the extermination of a large fraction of the earth’s animals, plants and microorganisms seems probable. The inhabitants size of Hemo sapiens possibly could be condensed to pre historic levels or below and annihilation of the human genus itself cannot be debarred. Question: Which of the following is one of the consequences of nuclear war? [English Comprehension]
         aSouthern hemisphere would remain quite safe in the post war period
         bPost war survivors being very few will have abundant food
         cFertility of land will last only for a year or so
         dLights would be cooler and more comfortable
         eNone of the above
FINISH Test ➤